Results may vary. Remember to include your physician in choosing the best treatment option for you. To discuss your particular situation and how our products can help, call toll-free at 1-866-237-9608.


Dear MendMeShop,

I recently ordered the Inferno Wrap and wanted to tell you how great it worked. I had a minor MCL tear and bursitis of the knee from a fall on ice in February, yes here in the Southern US, we do have ice sometimes and we don't know how to walk on it. Well, to make a long story short, I healed much faster and will recommend your product to others. Also, a representative from Mendmeshop called and asked how the product was working. This is unheard of in today's world. I never realized how long or involved a knee injury could be. Thank you for such a wonderful product.

Rating: Five Star Rating

Vivian Miller

 


More Facts About Achilles Tendonitis:

The Achilles tendon does not have a rich blood supply. Blood supply is weakest at a point between 2 and 6 cm above its insertion into the calcaneus (heel bone).


Ignoring pain in the Achilles tendon (ie. "running through the pain") is the biggest cause of chronic Achilles tendonitis.


For cyclists, initial Achilles tendon stress is often caused by having a low saddle height. This low saddle height can result in excessive dorsiflexion of the foot, which stresses the Achilles tendon.


The Achilles tendon is the connection between the heel and the most powerful muscle group in the body.


Tennis and soccer players over 40 are the most frequent sufferers of tennis leg (calf muscle strain).


Sudden increases in running and or active sprinting sports can cause Achilles tendonitis.


Excessive running up and down hills can aggravate the Achilles tendon.


Stiff shoe soles at the ball of the foot will increase Achilles tendon strain.


Excessive heel shock absorption can overstretch the Achilles tendon.


Tight hamstrings and/or tight calf muscles create excess strain on the Achilles tendon.


For triatheletes, the most common cause of injuries to the Achilles tendon is overpronation, inflexibility, or lack of strength.


Immobility, due to an Achilles injury, may result in a contracted Achilles tendon and an increased amount of scar tissue.

 

Our Experienced Sports Injury Specialists are Friendly and Very Helpful.




Achilles Tendinopathy Diagnosis

Diagnosing an Achilles Tendon Injury

The doctor will palpate your Achilles tendon to assess pain and abnormalities to make a diagnosis of your injury.

A physical exam or with diagnostic tests. To help your doctor achieve a proper diagnosis, he/she will begin with a medical history about you, your current condition and symptoms, the intensity of your pain, the duration of your symptoms and the limitations you are experiencing. Details about what causing the problem, when it started, and whether or not you have ever had treatments (for this or a similar condition in the past) are very helpful in assessing your injury.

Your doctor will visually assess and palpate (feel) the bones and soft tissue in and around both of your Achilles tendons to evaluate symmetry and spot any differences. Such as inflammation, swelling, bone deformity, scar tissue build up, and a weakened tendon. He/she will press on the injured tendon to test for tenderness, tough nodes of scar tissue, and jelly-like sections on the tendon. He/she will probably ask you to push down with the ball of your foot and toes (plantarflexing) to evaluate the flexibility, alignment, range of motion and pain level.

Common Diagnostic Tests

Diagnostic testing to obtain more detailed information, and assess the amount and/or type of damage done to your Achilles tendon. There are a variety of different tests available to help them analyze the situation; however the recommendation will be dependent on your injury.

The doctor will use The Thompson Test to determine if the Achilles tendon is ruptured. When the calf muscles are squeezed, the foot should go into plantarflexion if the Achilles tendon is intact.

The Thompson Test is a common physical exam that doctors use to determine if an Achilles tendon has ruptured.

This test involves the patient lying face down on the exam table with knees at a 90 degree angle. The doctor squeezes the calf muscles of the injured leg. If the foot flexes downward (like trying to point your toes) the Achilles tendon is not torn. If the Achilles tendon is torn, the foot does not move.

X-rays don't show much relative to tendons and other soft tissue but it will provide an image of the overall bone structure of your ankle. It is helpful in identifying bone spurs, calcifications within the tendon, fractures or degeneration of the heel bone.

CAT or CT scans can be used to provide a 3-dimensional assessment of the bones and soft tissues in and around your Achilles tendon and may be used to identify a tendon tear.

MRIs (magnetic resonance imaging) will provide more detailed information and will help to evaluate the Achilles tendon damage. An MRI can diagnose tendinosis, tissue damage and tears, and/or other associated conditions.

The type of test recommended will depend on your symptoms and the opinion of your medical professional.

Treating an Achilles Tendon Injury

Your doctor will give advice to use conservative treatments before even suggesting surgery. It is generally understood by doctors and surgeons, that surgery will introduce more scar tissue into the any already damaged tissue. This added scar tissue will be problematic, requiring more physical therapy and conservative treatment options post-surgery. If not dealt with properly, your tendonitis injury could end up in worse condition than before the surgery! This is why surgery is only performed as a last resort.

Most doctors, surgeons and orthopedic specialists will recommend conservative treatment methods for Achilles Tendon injuries before even considering surgery. Some conservative treatment methods recommended include:

  • Rest - This is important for initial healing of your Achilles Tendon is resting your ankle.This can be difficult when you have to carry on with daily activities, but resting and elevating your foot whenever you can is recommended. During your recovery you will probably have to modify or avoid the activities that put stress on your Achilles tendon until your pain and inflammation settles.
  • Increase blood flow to speed up healing of your achilles tendon injury.
  • Avoid Activities that Caused Your Injury - While resting your injury it's also important to avoid all activities that may have caused your tissue damage (especially any repetitive movement). Continuing on with regular activities will not only make your injury worse.
  • Apply Effective Cold Compression
    Effective Cold Compression = Treatment with a Freezie Wrap® Immediate cold (using a Freezie Wrap®) will help you to manage pain while getting rid of the pain and inflammation. Reducing inflammation can also relieve some of the pressure that's being placed on your tissue(s) and stop your injury from getting worse.
  • Use Blood Flow Stimulation Therapy - After any inflammation and/or swelling has been reduced, you can use your own blood flow to maximize healing of damaged tissue and maintain healthy blood flow to your tissue. This also boost overall long-term healing of this injury.


These easy to use and safe effective products, such as Cold Compression and Blood Flow Stimulation Therapy will effectively treat Achilles tendonitis, bursitis, tendon strain, and post-operative recovery. Such therapies will reduce your pain and heal your Achilles faster while treating the scar tissue that builds up on your Achilles tendon during the healing process. This is important because scar tissue leaves your Achilles tendon inflexible and at greater risk of re-injuty. To find out more about these and other easy-to-use therapies click here.


 
Specialized Hamstring Customer Service Advisor can help you with product selection.

Advanced Therapy for torn achilles, ruptured achilles, sprained ankle or other ankle injury

Ankle sprain treatment and pulled achilles treatment without surgery

An effective treatment

Relieve the pain of plantar fasciitis with a cold compress

This universal leg wrap can increase healing rate of a shin, calf, groin, thigh, or hamstring

Freezie Leg wrap for cold compression of the shin, calf, groin, thigh, or hamstring

Blood Flow Stimulation Therapy with an Inferno Back wrap for the ultimate in sore back healing

Freeze Wrap Back - reduce back pain and swelling in sore, strained or overused muscles, especially in the lower back and trapezius muscles

Knee Flex Passive Stretch Device for meniscus injury mcl injury and acl injury

Contact one of our Mendmeshop Customer Service Advisors for any questions help with ordering and recommended treatment directions