More Facts About Achilles Tendonitis:

The Achilles tendon does not have a rich blood supply. Blood supply is weakest at a point between 2 and 6 cm above its insertion into the calcaneus (heel bone).

Ignoring pain in the Achilles tendon (ie. "running through the pain") is the biggest cause of chronic Achilles tendonitis.

For cyclists, initial Achilles tendon stress is often caused by having a low saddle height. This low saddle height can result in excessive dorsiflexion of the foot, which stresses the Achilles tendon.

The Achilles tendon is the connection between the heel and the most powerful muscle group in the body.

Tennis and soccer players over 40 are the most frequent sufferers of tennis leg (calf muscle strain).

Sudden increases in running and or active sprinting sports can cause Achilles tendonitis.

Excessive running up and down hills can aggravate the Achilles tendon.

Stiff shoe soles at the ball of the foot will increase Achilles tendon strain.

Excessive heel shock absorption can overstretch the Achilles tendon.

Tight hamstrings and/or tight calf muscles create excess strain on the Achilles tendon.

For triatheletes, the most common cause of injuries to the Achilles tendon is overpronation, inflexibility, or lack of strength.

Immobility, due to an Achilles injury, may result in a contracted Achilles tendon and an increased amount of scar tissue.


Achilles Sports Injury Specialists Friendly Helpful.

Achilles Bursitis

A bursa is a sac of synovial fluid, rich in protein and collagen, that lies between a tendon and a bone to help the tendon glide smoothly over the bone. There are 2 bursae that surround the Achilles tendon to protect it from friction. The retrocalcaneal bursa lies between the tendon and the back, or posterior surface, of the heel bone (calcaneus). This is a "true" bursa that is present from birth. It acts as a cushion between these two structures to protect the tendon from friction against the heel bone.

Achilles Bursitis pain and inflammation can be treated naturally with ultrasonic therapy.

The larger subcutaneous calcaneal bursa lies overtop of the tendon at the lower part of the heel where the tendon joins to the heel bone. This bursa develops as you age, an "adventitious" bursa, to protect the tendon from friction at the back of the heel.

Bursitis occurs when a bursa is irritated from frequent pressure and it becomes inflamed. When one or both of these bursa become inflamed it is generally referred to as Achilles bursitis because of the bursa's proximity to the Achilles tendon. In some cases, an inflamed bursa can become infected with bacteria (referred to as septic bursitis) and it is necessary to see a doctor to get rid of the infection.

Due to the proximity to the area on the Achilles tendon, Achilles bursitis is often mistaken for tendinitis. Achilles bursitis is a common overuse injury in runners, ice skaters and other athletes.

Symptoms of Achilles bursitis

When you suffer from Achilles bursitis it will be most noticeable when you begin an activity after rest:

High heels can add pressure on the retrocalcaneal bursa, subcutaneous calcaneal bursa, and Achilles tendon.
  • Pain at the back of the heel, especially with jumping, hopping, tip-toeing, walking or running uphill or on soft surfaces. If tendonitis is also present, the pain can radiate away from the bursa.
  • Direct pressure on the bursa will exacerbate the pain and should be avoided if possible.
  • Tenderness and swelling which might make it difficult to wear certain shoes on the feet.
  • As the bursa becomes more inflamed you will experience swelling and warmth. In severe cases, the bursa will appear as a bump, called a "pump bump", and is usually red, and extremely tender. Swelling can cause difficulties moving as the range of motion in the ankle can be affected.
  • Limping due to the pain may occur
  • If you press on both sides of the inflamed heel, there may be a firm spongy feeling.
  • Weakness in the tendons and muscles surrounding the bursa can develop as the pain worsens and the inflammation in the area spreads.
  • Possibly a fever if you are suffering from septic bursitis (You will need to see a doctor for medication to get rid of the infection).
  • For individuals who wear high-heeled shoes frequently, they may also feel an increase in pain when they are wearing flat shoes. When wearing high-heels, the calf muscles and Achilles tendon remain in a shortened position. When flat shoes are worn it causes the calf muscles and Achilles tendon to stretch more than usual causing the tendon to tighten around the heel bone causing irritation.
Achilles Bursitis Causes
  • Tight shoes or shoes that do not fit properly can cause extra pressure on the back of the heel.
  • Athletes overtraining or runners increasing their distance to quickly.
  • Haglund deformity, a bony enlargement on the back of the heel bone, during dorsiflexion causes an impingement of the bursa between the Achilles tendon and the heel bone.

Bursitis Treatments - What You Can Do!

Tight or improperly fitted footware can add pressure to the Achilles tendon, subcutaneous calcaneal bursa, and retrocalcaneal bursa cause irritation which can lead to Achilles bursitis.

Relieving the symptoms of bursitis initially focuses on taking the pressure off the bursa. This can be done with proper cushioning, inserts, or footwear but may require surgery if it is a bone formation problem (i.e. Haglund's Deformity). If your bursitis is caused by an infection (septic bursitis), the doctor will probably drain the bursa sac with a needle and perscribe antibiotics to treat the infection.

For non-infectious bursitis, the preliminary treatment starts with conservative treatment options. Such options typically include cold compression therapy and Deep Tissue Regeneration Therapy. Surgery to remove the inflamed bursa is normally not required for bursitis, however if you fail to see improvement with the conservative treatments, your physician may recommend surgery to remove the bursa completely. Although this removes the problem of an inflamed bursa, you are left with less cushioning in your joint which can lead to other conditions such as fraying of the tendons, muscles or ligaments in the treated area. Eventually, fraying can lead to increasing weakness and rupture in severe cases.

Other Conservative Treatment Methods can be Risky

Cortisone is an injectible anti-inflammatory drug that is intended to reduce swelling and inflammation in the Achilles tendon. It is a short-term solution - this treatement does not lead to long-term healing of the Achilles tendon.

Alternative medications like cortisone injections are NOT advised for any type of Achilles Tendon condition. This is because there is increased risk of rupture of the tendon following a cortisone injection.

"Medical evidence shows that cortisone shots can damage the surrounding tissue, fray the Achilles tendon, and even trigger a rupture. Most side effects are temporary, but skin weakening (atrophy) and lightening of the skin (depigmentation) can be permanent." (reference: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons)


The most important factor in healing bursitis is resting your ankle. This can be difficult when you have to carry on with daily activities, but resting and elevating your foot whenever you can is recommended. During your recovery you will probably have to modify or avoid the activities that stress your bursa until your pain and inflammation settle.

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Treatments should involve decreasing swelling, relieving pain and stress on the ankle, correcting any biomechanical dysfunction (over-pronation or flat feet), treating scar tissue, and then restoring strength and movement in your ankle. If you are performing an activity that could cause further trauma to the bursa, it is recommended that you protect the area with padding and/or proper footwear to prevent further irritation or damage.

Cold Compression Therapy

For years, doctors, trainers, and other medical professionals have recommended RICE (Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation) to treat the pain and swelling of fresh injuries, chronic pain, and after any re-injury.

Cold Compression works by stopping and slowing nerve and cell function in the injured area and reducing swelling that can block blood vessels. This is important because once blood vessels are blocked or damaged, they can no longer carry oxygenated blood through the tissue and tissue cells begin to break-down. Without cold compression therapy cellular break-down and tissue damage continues as the cells do not get the oxygen they need to survive. By limiting the amount of damage done to your Achilles Tendon, you also limit the amount of healing that needs to occur.

After applying cold compression to reduce initial swelling, begin using Deep Tissue Regeneration Therapy (via the Achilles T•Shellz Wrap to continue the healing process.

Deep Tissue Regeneration Therapy

Once the inflammation of your bursitis has been reduced with an ice pack or cold compress, it is time to help the body boost its healing process through use of the Achilles TShellz Wrap.

Unfortunately, when you are suffering from bursitis in your retrocalcaneal bursa and/or subcutaneous calcaneal bursa it is painful to walk and move your foot normally. When you limit movement in your foot the blood flow is reduced, starving your tissue of the necessary oxygen and nutrients. The trick is to find a way to increase blood flow without causing pain and/or further inflaming the bursae. This is where Deep Tissue Regeneration Therapy (Blood Circulation Boost Therapy) becomes a powerful tool.

Helping to improve the elasticity of the achilles tendon as well as surrounding soft tissue. Further to this, your injury area will receive a magnified increase in blood flow which will flush toxins that always build up around a soft tissue injury and introduce more nutrients (its in the blood!) to damaged cells so they can heal at a highly accelerated rate. We guarantee that this will get your bursae and/or Achilles tendon back to normal fast.

Blood Circulation Boost Therapy compliments your body's natural healing process by promoting the flow of blood to your foot while you give it the rest it needs.


Each Achilles TShellz Wrap contains an Energy Pad that is flexible and shaped to conform around the back of your ankle. This Energy Pad provides a uniform wave of healing electromagnetic energy over the entire treatment area. This energy travels deep inside your Achilles bursa to stimulate the blood flow that is needed to heal your injury. It is the electromagnetic energy provided by our Achilles TShellz Wrap that is crucial to the healing process.

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Electromagnetic energy waves are not heat waves. When they are emitted from the TShellz Wrap they penetrate right through your skin and fat layers until they get to your Achilles tendon. Once they reach the injured area, they are absorbed and quickly converted into heat energy right at the location of your injury. Giving your body the boost it needs to continue the reconditioning process. The healing energy reaches deep into your subcutaneous calcaneal bursa, retrocalcaneal bursa and Achilles tendon to speed tissue repair, whisk away the toxins and dead cells, and rejuvenate your ankle tissues for improved elasticity.

This 2 step process is the most effective way to treat Achilles bursitis and improve the health of the soft tissue in your ankle.

Learn more about the Achilles TShellz Wrap

Learn more about Achilles Tendon Surgery and Post Operative Rehab


Achilles Tendon Facts

There are over 250,000 achilles tendon injuries each year in the US.

Achilles tendon ruptures are common in people between the ages of 30 and 50.

In runners, too rapid an increase in mileage, hill training without proper strengthening, and recent or inadequate changes to running gear can cause injuries to the Achilles tendon.

Achilles tendonitis accounts for an estimated 11% of running injuries.

3-5% of athletes are forced to leave their sports career due to Achilles tendon overuse injuries that go untreated.

Medications mask the pain but do very little in the healing of Achilles tendonitis. Anti-inflammatories, cortisone injections, and pain killers can cause Achilles tendonitis to worsen.

A fully ruptured tendon REQUIRES surgery. It will not heal on its own.

Achilles tendonitis and Achilles tendinitis are the same thing.

Continually using your Achilles tendon while it is injured will lead to a more serious and/or chronic injury.


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Deep tissue therapy for torn achilles, ruptured achilles, achilles tendon

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